Updated at: 09-06-2022 - By: cnbusinessnews

Choosing the perfect wood-burning stove for your home can be a daunting undertaking. Stoves come in a wide variety of shapes, sizes, styles, functions, and heating capacities.

There were several considerations to be made before purchasing the perfect wood burning or multi-fuel stove for us a few years ago. As a result, I’ve compiled this buying guide to highlight the most important features to consider when shopping for a wood burning stove.

When purchasing a wood stove, the most important items to look for are:

  • Wood burning, multi fuel or pellet stove
  • Stoves that burn wood, multifuel, or pellets are all options.
  • Heat output based on size
  • Efficiency
  • EPA-certified or DEFRA-approved products are both acceptable options.
  • Non-catalytic & catalytic processes
  • Airwash
  • Affordability
  • Combustion that occurs after the primary combustion.
  • Ash bin
  • Blower

You can see what our wood stove looks like, what characteristics it has, and why we decided to buy it in the next sections of this article.

What To Look For When Buying A Wood Burning Stove

1) Wood Burning, Multi Fuel Or Pellet Stove

Stoves can be classified as “wood burning” in three distinct ways, depending on your preferences, the fuel kinds and costs available to you and the fuel types you intend to use. Here are some examples:

  • Stove made from wood
  • It is a multi-fuel stove.
  • a stove that burns wood pellets

Wood Burning Stove

A wood burning stove is a good option if you simply want to use wood in your home and want to keep things simple.

How to choose the best wood for your woodburner - Dovre Stoves

Our own wood-burning stove can be seen here:

Because wood burning stoves are made to burn solely wood, they can’t be used to burn other fuels like coal efficiently.

The controls on a wood-burning stove (the air vents) are simpler than the controls on a multi-fuel stove because the wood-burning stove is only designed to burn wood (which allows you to burn types of fuel other than wood).

Our wood stove only has one controlled air vent, although others have two (one at the bottom and one at the top), making it easier to control the entire fire with only one handle. It makes the task of starting and maintaining a fire in your wood stove a little bit easier for us..”

Consider a wood-burning stove with a single controlled air vent if you are searching for simplicity and ease of usage. A compromise can be made with the other things to look for when choosing a wood stove if using two air vents isn’t substantially more difficult.

A wood-burning stove that can be converted to burn other types of solid fuel may be an option for you even if you don’t plan on doing so in the near future.

In order to use our wood stove as a multifuel appliance, we must install a multifuel conversion kit, which replaces the stove’s base and adds a grate, ash pan, and an extra air vent.

If burning other forms of fuel is something you’d like to do in the future but you’re set on getting a wood stove now, search for one that has the option of being converted to burn several fuels.

Multi Fuel Stove

Look for a multi fuel stove if you’d want to be able to burn other types of fuel besides wood, such as coal.

We usually use our multi-fuel stove to cook with wood, but it’s built up so that we may use coal if we choose.

Wood stoves are designed to supply air from the top in order to ensure that it burns efficiently.

As a result, multi-fuel stoves allow for the burning of both wood and coal by allowing you to adjust the airflow to either the top or bottom of the fire.

In appearance, multifuel stoves resemble wood-burning stoves, but they differ slightly in that they may burn a variety of fuels in addition to wood.

  • Fireboxes with metal grate bases instead of flat surfaces.
  • An ashtray featuring a pull-out ash pan compartment.
  • Additional ash pan compartment air vent to supply air to the area below the fire.

Multi-fuel stoves and wood burning stoves have a number of key differences, which we go over in greater depth in this section.

Look for a multi fuel stove if you want the flexibility of burning several types of fuel in your home.

Because multifuel stoves operate in a slightly different manner than do wood-burning stoves, I’ve taken the time to explain them in greater detail and include diagrams to illustrate how they work.

Pellet Stove

Consider purchasing a pellet stove if you prefer to burn pellets instead of wood or coal.

Using a hopper mechanism, pellet stoves assure a continuous output of heat by feeding pellets (usually made of wood, but other types of pellet fuels are available) into the fire at a controlled rate.

Although some pellet stoves are battery driven, most require a mains electric source to work.

Here, I’ve covered the most important aspects of pellet stoves.

2) Freestanding Or Insert

Freestanding wood and multi-fuel stoves were put inside the existing fireplace space, but we might have chosen a fireplace insert that filled the full opening.

The only difference between a freestanding stove and a stove insert is that a stove insert must be installed in an existing fireplace. It is possible to set a freestanding stove anywhere you like; it is not required to be installed in a fireplace if you don’t want it to be.

The options for fireplace inserts are considerably more varied, so you can select one that is one of the following:

  • Wood,
  • It’s plugged in.
  • Gas.

When it comes to heating your home, a freestanding stove or a fireplace insert are better options than an open fireplace.

3) Steel Or Cast Iron Body

Steel and cast iron are the two most common materials used to build wood-burning stoves. Heat conductors like copper and aluminum are ideal for stoves, but they release heat in different ways.

Should you choose a wood burning or multi-fuel stove? - Dovre Stoves

There are advantages and disadvantages to both steel and wood stoves. Steel stoves release heat more quickly, but they don’t keep and radiate heat as long. However, even after the fire is out, cast iron stoves continue to radiate heat for an extended amount of time, even though they take longer to heat up.

Since cast iron stoves are made from a single piece, there are more patterns and designs to choose from. Steel stoves have a sleeker, more contemporary appearance.

Steel stoves are less expensive than cast iron ones because they are easier to produce.

Although the door of our cast iron multifuel stove is cast iron, our wood-burning stove is built of steel.

When purchasing a wood stove, it is important to consider the sort of heat output, cost, and design you desire before making a final decision. Both types of wood-burning stoves can be quite efficient, regardless of the material they are made of.

4) Size & Heat Output

Choose a wood heater that is appropriate for the space it will heat in your home when making a purchase.

A stove that is too small for the amount of room it is heating can cause you to repeatedly run your stove at an excessively high temperature.

If the air vents are wide open when you’re trying to heat the area, a hot stove can burn up the wood too quickly to be efficient. Over-firing can also cause damage to the stove’s components, which might fracture or deform owing to temperatures they weren’t meant for, when the stove is consistently operating too hot.

When a stove is purchased in excess of the space it will heat, it may be misused and underperform.

It is possible that the wood stove may not be able to attain optimal operating temperatures if its fire is too tiny for the stove’s size. This is what our stove thermometer shows when a stove isn’t working properly: increased creosote (tar) and smoke.

When shopping for a wood burning stove, it’s critical to consider factors like size and heat production.

A wood burning stove’s size and heat output for your home will be determined by a variety of factors, so consult with an expert to learn more.

  • Measure the area you plan to heat.
  • Consider whether you have adequate space for the required offset distances in your fireplace.
  • Your home’s level of airtightness and insulation.

5) Efficiency

You can tell how efficient a wood-burning stove is by looking at its official efficiency rating. Stoves with greater efficiency ratings are better at maximizing the amount of heat they can generate from each piece of wood.

As a result of the stove’s improved efficiency rating, less heat is lost down the chimney.

Expect to pay a little extra for a wood-burning stove with a high efficiency rating if it has a strong efficiency rating.

Anything beyond a 70 percent efficiency rate is acceptable, as a few percentage points won’t make much of a difference. 78.9% of the time, our wood burning stove is highly effective at keeping our living room warm.

On May 15, 2020, the new EPA regulations will come into effect, requiring wood stoves to emit less than 2.0g/h of smoke.

6) Certified (Or Approved) Stoves

A wood stove that has been approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will give you peace of mind knowing it won’t harm the environment. With today’s modern stoves, there is little to no smoke, and the wood is burned as efficiently as possible so that less firewood is used to generate the most heat and to minimize ash deposits.

It’s reassuring to know that many modern wood stoves are EPA-approved, so you can rest assured that you’re getting a stove that is efficient.

The whole list of EPA Approved wood stoves may be found here if you need additional information.

EPA Approved stoves that satisfy the 2020 smoke emission standard of 2.0g/h should be on your radar.

It is the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) that oversees stoves in the United Kingdom (DEFRA). If you live in a Smoke Control Area (SCA), you must have a stove that has been authorized by the DEFRA.

A DEFA-certified wood-burning stove is one that has been tested and authorized by the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DEFRA) for use in Smoke Control Areas.

In this article, I go into greater depth on DEFRA-approved stoves, including how and why our own stoves are DEFRA-approved.

7) Catalytic & Non-Catalytic

To compensate for the additional complexity they provide, higher-end wood burning stoves often use catalytic combustion to improve efficiency and cleanliness when burning wood.

Non-catalytic wood stoves make up the majority of the market. Through mechanisms like secondary combustion, these stoves are still capable of delivering great efficiency and heat outputs (more about secondary in another one of our articles here). For a more efficient way to burn wood, most stoves combine a firebox with a baffle and a tertiary air intake (which is how our own wood stove works.)

Before departing a wood burner with catalytic combustion, smoke goes through a catalytic element. A honeycomb-like structure aids in the removal of waste smoke and particles, resulting in a more efficient burn. Because the element must be replaced on a regular basis, the stove is less efficient. Additionally, a catalytic stove demands more of your time and effort to get the most out of it.

For those who want the cleanest possible burn possible when burning wood in their home, a catalytic stove is the way to go. However, this comes with a higher price tag and more complicated maintenance requirements.

To learn more about catalytic and non-catalytic stoves, go here.

8) Airwash

If you want a wood stove with a clean glass door, search for one with an integrated airwash system, which can be found in many models.

I’ve detailed how airwash works in wood stoves here, but in essence, airwash provides a flow of air along the interior of the glass to assist prevent particles from accumulating on the glass and impeding the view to the fire.

Airwash is a feature on both our wood burning and multi-fuel stoves. For the most part, we don’t have to use any cleaning products as long as we employ these two methods.

Look for a wood-burning stove with an airwash system if you want your glass to remain clean during each fire.

9) Ease Of Use

The air vents of a wood-burning stove are the primary means of controlling a fire.

In order to choose a wood burning stove that is simple to operate, seek for one with a controlled air vent rather than two or more.

Our wood stove features a single air vent that is positioned beneath the stove and has a control handle that protrudes from the front of the appliance. The back of the firebox has a series of vents that supply tertiary air, which is controlled by this vent (more about the types of airflow in stoves here).

10) Secondary Combustion

To increase the temperature, waste gases from the fire are burned off in a process called secondary combustion, also known as secondary burn. Secondary combustion is aided by the addition of fresh air to the stove slightly above the flames.

It’s important to seek for the word “secondary burn” when purchasing a wood-burning stove in order to verify that you’re receiving an effective appliance for your home.

11) Ash Bin

The ash bin on many wood stoves can be removed from underneath the firebox, making it simple to get rid of the ashes in between uses.

Unless you want to leave your wood stove burning for a long period of time, you’ll want to seek for a stove with an ash bin.

12) Blower

A wood-burning stove with a blower is the best option if you want to circulate hot air around the room.

In the absence of a blower, our wood burner adequately warms our living room.

If your wood stove does not have a blower, you can purchase a stove fan to help distribute heated air around your home.

How to Choose Your Fireplace - Jayline

Best Wood Stoves In 2022 (Comparison)

1. Best Wood Stove Insert: Ashley Hearth AW1820E

In the end, the ideal wood stove is one that meets or exceeds all of the required specifications. The Ashley Hearth AW1820E is the only wood stove that has ever done so well. Ashley Hearth is one of the top wood stove manufacturers, and this is their flagship model.

The Ashley Hearth AW1820E saves a lot of power and is a great addition to any home. With an energy efficiency of over 75%, a wood stove is the most effective way to use wood to generate heat. A 69,000 BTU/hr heat output is more than adequate for the majority of households. Up to 1,800 square feet of total heating space (with almost 30 BTU heating output per sq ft).

With an efficiency of 69,000 BTU/h, the Ashley Hearth AW1820E is even more astounding. In most cases, wood stoves lose more than 40% of the heat generated by burning wood. The Ashley Hearth AW1820E is one of the most efficient wood stoves with a 75% efficiency rating.

Such a high level of efficiency has two primary advantages:

  • A very low level of smoke is emitted from this device.
  • Exceptionally lengthy burn duration of 12 hours (average for a wood stove burn time is about 4h).

There is a lot of appreciation for the 8-hour burn time. The Ashley Hearth AW1820E can be loaded at 12 p.m. and you may go to sleep and get up at 8 a.m. and still have the wood burner heating your home.

Logs up to 28 inches long can be used in the fireplace. There are 2.4 cubic feet of volume in the firebox, and it has a width of 21 inches.

Aside from few minor issues, Ashley Hearth AW1820E is the best wood stove insert. For a modest price, you may have a 69,000 BTU/h wood stove with good efficiency and low emissions.

Pros

  • Most well-balanced wood-burning stoves
  • 69,000 BTU/h wood-burning stove with an efficiency of +75 percent
  • Low emitted levels
  • It has a 12-hour burn time, making it ideal for nocturnal use.
  • Elegant Ashley Hearth, but at a reasonable price.

Cons

  • It’s not uncommon for it to be unavailable.

2. Best Pedestal Wood Stove: Ashley Hearth AW1120E-P

In the end, the ideal wood stove is one that meets or exceeds all of the required specifications. The Ashley Hearth AW1820E is the only wood stove that has ever done so well. Ashley Hearth is one of the top wood stove manufacturers, and this is their flagship model.

The Ashley Hearth AW1820E saves a lot of power and is a great addition to any home. With an energy efficiency of over 75%, a wood stove is the most effective way to use wood to generate heat. A 69,000 BTU/hr heat output is more than adequate for the majority of households. Up to 1,800 square feet of total heating space (with almost 30 BTU heating output per sq ft).

With an efficiency of 69,000 BTU/h, the Ashley Hearth AW1820E is even more astounding. In most cases, wood stoves lose more than 40% of the heat generated by burning wood. The Ashley Hearth AW1820E is one of the most efficient wood stoves with a 75% efficiency rating.

  • A very low level of smoke is emitted from this device.
  • Exceptionally lengthy burn duration of 12 hours (average for a wood stove burn time is about 4h).

There is a lot of appreciation for the 8-hour burn time. The Ashley Hearth AW1820E can be loaded at 12 p.m. and you may go to sleep and get up at 8 a.m. and still have the wood burner heating your home.

Logs up to 28 inches long can be used in the fireplace. There are 2.4 cubic feet of volume in the firebox, and it has a width of 21 inches.

Aside from few minor issues, Ashley Hearth AW1820E is the best wood stove insert. For a modest price, you may have a 69,000 BTU/h wood stove with good efficiency and low emissions.

Pros

  • Most well-balanced wood-burning stoves
  • 69,000 BTU/h wood-burning stove with an efficiency of +75 percent
  • Low emitted levels
  • It has a 12-hour burn time, making it ideal for nocturnal use.
  • Elegant Ashley Hearth, but at a reasonable price.

Cons

  • It’s not uncommon for it to be unavailable.

3. Drolet Escape 1500-I Review (Most Efficient Wood Stove Insert)

This wood stove is the most eco-friendly and convenient on the market. Drolet Escape 1500-I It’s the most efficient wood stove insert, making it ideal for houses of all sizes to enjoy.

In most cases, installing an insert is far easier than installing a pedestal wood stove. The Drolet Escape 1500-I insert wood stove is a one-stop shop for all of your stove needs.

Its heat output is 65,000 BTU/h. This can heat a 1,800-square-foot home, but it’s best used in a 500-square-foot to 1,200-square-foot area.

More than any other wood stove, it achieves an efficiency rating of 78%. This means a significant reduction in the amount of wood burned, but that’s just the beginning.

There are less emissions and a longer burn time with high-efficiency wood stove inserts.

The Drolet Escape 1500-I emits smoke at a record-low 1.26 g/h. Compared to the EPA certification limit (4.5 g/h), this is a significant reduction. You can also leave it on overnight because it has a 6-hour burn time.

The kit includes the 29′′ x 44′′ blackplate you’ll need to complete the installation. The use of a high-quality blower will ensure even distribution of the heat generated by the wood burner.

Overall, the Drolet Escape 1500-I is the best wood-burning stove insert on the market. It emits a record low amount of carbon dioxide and has an efficiency of 78%. (eco-friendly). Furthermore, it’s one of the most visually appealing wood stoves around.

Pros

  • Wood stove insert with a 78 percent efficiency rating.
  • Particulate emission rates of just 1.26 g/h are a record low.
  • Interior design appeal; the blackplate that comes with it adds a touch of class.
  • A heat output of 65,000 BTU/h is adequate for the majority of modern residences.

Cons

  • Again, the higher weight of the device creates a challenge for the high-quality Drolet materials (360 lbs)
  • An 18-inch log can replace a 22-inch log.

4. US Stove US1269E Review (Best High Efficient Wood Burning Stove)

For decades, US Stove has been a household name in the hearth industry. The US Stove US1269E wood stove is one of their offerings.

For those looking for something smaller, this stove weighs in at just 130 pounds. Despite this, it has a heating output of up to 54,000 BTU/h. The wood stove from US Stove can be used in 900 square feet of space.

The Drolet Escape, on the other hand, has a BTU output of around the same. Drolet Escape’s BTU output is a little higher, but its recommended area use is twice as large – 1,800 sq ft.

The US Stove US1269E can hold wood up to 19 inches in diameter. The form of the stove (with its long horizontal dimension) indicates that it can accommodate logs of this length.

Overall, the US Stove US1269E falls short of the best contemporary wood stoves. It’s little, lacks in artistic flair, but it’s a bargain. US Stove US1269E is a low-cost and low-performance wood stove.

Pros

  • Aimed towards homes with fewer square feet (up to 900 sq ft)
  • 19-inch logs can be fed.
  • You may get it for a low price.

Cons

  • High-performance stoves aren’t they?
  • Emission rates and burn area aren’t known.
  • Compared to the best wood stoves on the market, it’s abysmal in nearly every way.

FAQs

Wood-burning stoves, by their very nature, raise a number of concerns that have yet to be resolved. Here are some of the most frequently asked questions:

What Is The Best Wood Stove On The Market?

The Drolet Blackcomb II is certainly the best wood stove on the market, as demonstrated in the comparison of the best models.

The Drolet Blackcomb II exceeds all other top-rated wood stoves in a spec-by-spec comparison. It boasts an efficiency of 70%, a burn time of six hours, and low emissions.

There’s only one drawback: It won’t work to heat large residences over 2000 square feet.

What Wood Stove Burns The Longest?

Between 2 and 6 hours can be the maximum burn period for a wood-burning stove. For example, the Drolet Blackcomb II has the longest burn time of 6 hours.

Firebox size, efficiency levels, BTU production, and other factors influence the amount of time it takes to burn. For the longest burn time, the best-engineered wood stoves use the most well-balanced mix of these ingredients.

Where Is The Best Place To Put A Wood Burning Stove?

As close to the center of the room as feasible should be placed pedestal wood stoves. Consider the practicalities of this, as well as its appeal.

In terms of energy and distribution, being in the center of the space is the most logical place to be. However, you can’t actually put anything there if that space is already taken.

When installing an insert wood stove, select a wall with the simplest chimney connection. With insert stoves, we’re more likely to look at the practical aspects. In theory, an insert wood-burning stove should be placed in the middle of the wall.

How Long Do Wood Stoves Last?

Stoves that burn wood have a lifespan of 10 to 20 years. Let’s break it down into two groups, because that’s a wide range:

  1. Ten years is the average lifespan of a wood-burning stove that is less expensive. Their weight-to-BTU ratio is usually lower.
  2. Wood stoves that are more expensive can last up to 20 years (with proper maintenance even more).

It’s important to keep in mind that the principal cost of a 10- to 20-year wood stove isn’t the stove itself, but rather the wood.

Can A Wood Stove Heat An Entire House?

We’ve been trained to believe that fireplaces can only be used to heat a kitchen. Certainly, but modern wood stoves are different. According to the EPA, the majority of them are powerful enough to heat an entire house.

Wood-burning stoves with greater capacity can produce up to 100,000 BTU/h. The entire house might be heated with that much energy.

It’s A Wrap!

This guide on picking a wood stove will help you, I hope. If you’re planning on getting one for your home, utilize this as a reference. You can assure that you acquire what you need by doing this. A wood stove can be built and installed in a garage by following these instructions.